How to Draw an Exploded Perspective

Point Prespective - Exploded 2-Point

Here, I will demonstrate how to draw a simple Exploded 2-Point Perspective.

Before we move on to 'How to draw a two point perspective', you will require a plan and an elevation of the 'Object' you wish to draw perspective of. With a more complex object you may require more than one elevation and possibly a section as well. All of which must be the same scale.

In the example that follows the elevations are comparatively simple, so they may not be necessary. Providing you know the dimensions it may be easier just to use a scale instead. However, on more complex objects it is not recommended, but it is possible to do an accurate perspective without the elevation views.

Next you will require a larger worktop to layout the plan, elevation and your working drawing. Once these have been set-up they must to be taped down. Next you will need a longer straightedge, a scale to match the scale of the plan, and the trusty pencil. In more complex jobs it may be advisable to use a range of coloured pencils.

On more complex studies you work will tend to a little dirty the longer you work on it. To avoid this, use a dusting brush regularly and avoid sliding the straightedge across your work.

An exploded perspective can become a complex drawing that if too complex will defeat its purpose. The main difference between the exploded perspective compared to the exploded axonometric is the regression lines. On an axonometric projection these lines are parallel. Yet in Perspective the regression line of one offset component compared to its neighbour can be disorientating.

As a standard the the exploded perspective is generally a 2-point perspective with the viewing point above the object. Other types of perspective can be used depending on the purpose of the exploded perspective.

To draw a perspective you will require a Plan & elevation of the 'object' been drawn. Both of which must be to the scale. However, if the 'object' been drawn is comparatively simple the elevation may not be necessary and the horizontal dimensions can be scaled.

In the first demonstration that follows an external one point perspective will be reviewed. Where you will be shown the importance of how to set-up your proposed perspective and how to adjust the components such as the focal point, horizon and distance. Including how the arch of vision is applied to a one point perspective. Then to add a little extra the buildings are all different size and are at different levels.

As you work through the slides below you may come across a link to an associated footnote. You can either follow the links and return to the related slide, or read the footnotes at the bottom of the page after you have completed the demonstration.

Before we move on 'How to draw' a Exploded 2-Point perspective, you will require a plan, elevation and in some cases a section of the 'Object' you wish to draw perspective of. All must be the same scale.

perspective-object-plan-elevation

Object - Plan - Elevation

In this example the elevations are comparatively simple so they may not be necessary. Providing you know the dimensions it may be easier just to use a scale. However, it is not recommended on more complex objects, but it is possible to do an accurate perspective without the elevation views.

To draw perspective you will require a larger worktop to position the plan, and elevations on. Once these have been setup they must to be taped down. Next you will need a longer straightedge, a scale to match and the trusty pencil. In more complex jobs it may be advisable to use a range of coloured pencils. Then for the axonometric projections a adjustable set-square would be useful.

Point by Point Demonstration

  • 1: The set-up is not much different to other perspectives. Place the plan of the object above the working drawing and rotate it to suit. On a point on the object place the Focal Point.
    Next, determine the distance of the Viewing Point and Link the Viewing Point and Focal Point with the Line of Vision.
    At the Focal Point and perpendicular to the Line of Vision add the Picture Plane.
    At the Viewing Point and perpendicular to the Line of Vision add the Horizon.
    Then parallel to the 2 visible faces of the object add a Construction Line from the Viewing Point to the Picture Plane.
    Then from that intersection drop a perpendicular Line to the Horizon. These points will be the 2 vanishing points (VP).
    Lastly, place the elevation to the left of the working drawing and position it at a height to suit the Horizon. In this example the Horizon is above the object.

  • 2: Firstly, the corner points of the object must be mapped.

    From the Viewing Point draw a Construction Line to each Corner of the object.
    Where the Construction Line Intersects the Picture Plane add a perpendicular Vertical Line and extend it beyond the elevation.

  • 3: Here is an example where the rotation of an object becomes detrimental to it's purpose.
    You can see from the spacing of Vertical Line that there is just too much happening in a very short space.
    It would be better to rotate the object less and have the Vertical Line more evenly spaced.
    So lets make an adjustment.

  • 4: After rotating the object, the Vertical Line are mapped again in much the same way. From the Viewing Point draw a Construction Line to each Corner of the object. Where the Construction Line Intersects the Picture Plane add a perpendicular Line and extend it beyond the elevation.

  • 5: Because of the new rotation, new vanishing points must be set-up. Then parallel to the 2 visible faces of the object add a Construction Line from the Viewing Point to the Picture Plane. Then from that intersection drop a perpendicular Line to the Horizon. These points will be the 2 vanishing points (VP).

  • 6: Here the heights will be mapped. From the elevation, project the Heights to the Line of Vision. Then from those Intersections of the 2 lower heights draw a Regression Line to both the left and right VP. Then add a Regression Line from the upper height to the right VP. This will be used later.

  • 7: With the Regression Line in place the first faces can be drawn. To clarify the process a temporary coloured frame is added in its true position to indicate the origin of the offset face. On plan the same colour indicates which face is being drawn. An important aspect of the exploded face is that it is always the same size in a offset position as it would be in its true position. The offset may vary but usually linked to, or on line with its regression line. Later, when more faces are in place we will look at the position of each face in more detail.

  • 8: Next we will tackle the top to the lower portion. Add 2 Regression Line from the top of the first Frame to the right VP. Then from the far end of the second Frame draw a Regression Line to the left VP. With the Regression Lines in place a Frame is added and the Face is drawn at an offset.

  • 9: Before the upper side face can be added the regression of its height must be mapped. Where the Upper Regression Line Intersects the corner Vertical Line at the far end of the side Frame draw a Regression Line to the left VP. This will be the height at the far end. Next the regression must be mapped. Where the last Regression Line Intersects the Vertical Line draw a Regression Line to the right VP and extend it to the near side. Then do the same to map the base regression line. Thereafter the Frame is drawn and the offset Face is added.

  • 10. To map the top draw the 2 Regression Lines from cap of the Frame of side face to the left VP. Then where the near side Regression Line intersects the far side Vertical Line draw a Regression Line to the right VP. Thereafter draw the offset Face to the top.

  • 11. Next we will map and draw the near Face. The Regression Line to the top is in place. To do the base regression line we first have to map its position. So, from the bottom left of the first Frame draw a Regression Line to the right VP. Where that Regression Line intersects the corner Vertical Line draw the base Regression Line to the left VP. Thereafter, add the Frame and the offset Face.

  • 12. Next the back face will be added. From the base of the side Frame add a Regression Line to the right VP. Thereafter, add the Frame and offset Face.

  • 13. Then there is the back to the lower segment that must be added. With all the adjoining faces in place, add the Frame and offset Face.

  • 14. Before we move on to doing the last two faces, lets review the offsets. Remember the frames we have added are temporary to help with mapping and will be removed later. Whenever a face is added it is the same size and dimensions as the frame but is offset by a varying distance. Ideally, the offsets to all faces should be consistent. But there will come the time when an exception must be applied. Each offset face must revile a portion of every side/edge to that face. If one or more edges of the face are obscured by another face it should be repositioned to revile a small portion of the hidden edge.

  • 15. . With all the adjoining frames in place add the 'L' shaped Face to the far end.

  • 16. Finally, add the floor to its offset position.

  • 17. Here we have the complete perspective with the frames still in place.

  • 18. And finally the completed perspective without the frames.

Footnotes


Google Search